What’s the most important skill I’ve learnt from our startup?

skillsThat was a question I was asked last night.  I was fortunate to be invited to be one of the mentors at a startup mentoring session held last night in the city.

Now that we’re out of nappies and are starting to wear big kids pants, being asked to mentors others who have big, bright ideas is not only an honour but a way that I feel like I can give back for those who took the time to mentor us on our startup journey.

When I was asked the question, I’ve got to admit that I found it hard to come up with a quick answer.  Having been in business for most of my adult life, I feel like I’ve amassed a number of skills along the way, so coming up with one that’s particular to this startup journey is not easy.

I really had to dig deep to come up with a particular skill.  I’d definitely learned how tenacious I can be (but that’s not a skill), I’ve learnt just how much pain I can bear (!), (also not a skill).  I’ve dug deep to use every bit of marketing and business knowledge I’ve amassed over 30 years in business (not new) and, while we have a tech business, I haven’t learnt to code (we’ve employed that skill) so that doesn’t count either.  I’ve continued to learn about business, am an avid reader of all things around growth hacking, but again, that’s not a skill as much as it’s thinking a little differently about what I kind-of already knew.  I’ve managed staff before, and I’m an Accountant by training, so have got the financial thing mastered too.

So what new skill have I learnt?

After standing for what seemed like an eternity mumbling phrases like, “hmmmm, good question” and “let me think…”, I finally came up with one – consultative selling.

I’m the first to admit that I’m not a sales person – not by a long shot.  Cold calling scares me silly and selling has never been something I’ve considered myself good at – or even capable of.

But over the last few years, I’ve realized that it’s not that hard – in fact, at times, I really like it.

I give credit for that skill to a client – one in particular.  She was the HR manager at a franchise group of well-known fast food brands.  It was one of my very early sales calls, my first big potential one – and I was all by myself.  There I was, sitting in their boardroom, armed with my nifty powerpoint presentation and a list of bullet points to go through to tell her how great our product was.  And in she walked – or rather strode.

The first thing she did was pull every blind open, each one made a bang, then strode to me and shook my hand.  She sat (or rather plopped) down and, before I could say a word, said “So, tell me why I should buy anything from you?”

Talk about taken aback.

And then she smiled, very warmly.

I immediately let go of my breath, realizing that she was actually not at all terrifying but she was actually messing around with me and, without thinking any further, my competitive nature go the better of me so I smiled and said back “Well, why don’t you tell me what I’d need to do to be able to do that?”

And that’s where the magic happened.

She immediately gave me a list of all of the problems she had and all of the solutions she was looking for.  And I had the perfect client brief.

That one conversation taught me what consultative selling really is – finding out exactly what a potential client is looking for – and we use it every time now because it works.  It’s taken me from something i thought I hated – selling – to something I really enjoy for a number of reasons.  The first is that it gives me a way to know exactly how to position Workible to clients, it gives me true insight into what our clients want, it gives us ideas for further Workible features that our clients want (and will pay for)  and, just as importantly, it actually allows us to build relationships with our clients by talking about them.

And all of that gives us a huge competitive advantage in our market.

It’s an interesting question to pose to yourself – and I’ve just asked Alli (my partner in Workible crime) the same question.  Her answer?  “Hmmm…… I’ll have to think about that.”  Funny, huh?

See her answer in the next blog.  In the meantime, what’s yours?

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What’s the most important skill I’ve learnt from our startup?

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